Jun 222016
 

Part-time position (20 hrs./week @ $9.00 hour) open to assist with picking up donations, helping with minor maintenance tasks & grass cutting.

Must be able to lift 50 lbs, have a drivers license, clear driving history & be able to pass a SLED background check.

Submit Application to

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition

236 Union Street

Spartanburg, SC 29302

shrcc@aol.com

No Phone Calls Please

EOE

Application for Employment

Jun 212016
 

Bystander Intervention article:

Three California women are being credited for stopping a potential sexual assault attempt after they said they spoke out about a man who appeared to be putting something into a woman’s drink.

Sonia Ulrich, Marla Saltzer and Monica Kenyon said they were at a Santa Monica hotel for happy hour last Thursday when Kenyon first noticed a man and a woman at a nearby table who appeared to be on a date.

Read More

Jun 212016
 

Checking up on applicants’ social media profiles is becoming routine for many employers and admissions offices around the country. There’s nothing wrong with using social platforms for fun, but a little awareness will go a long way. This is our guide to taking control of your online reputation.

Most people treat their social media accounts as purely social outlets, casually updating statuses and posting photos with little expectation of scrutiny from friends or followers. The idea that these actions could seriously limit educational or professional prospects rarely impedes sharing. Unfortunately, it should.

Checking up on applicants’ social media profiles is becoming routine for many employers and admissions offices around the country. Recruiters say social media helps them gain a more comprehensive picture of a candidate than a simple resume and cover letter. Depending on how they view what they find, an applicant’s web presence can make or break an offer. This is especially true for students or recent graduates lacking a detailed job history to support their application.

There’s nothing wrong with using social platforms for fun, that’s what they’re for. Don’t run off and remove every cat gif from your Tumblr account; no employer expects or wants that. But a little awareness will go a long way. We sat down with Diane Domeyer, executive director of the The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service for interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals, to get a better idea of the importance of an online reputation and the effects it can have. Having recently run several surveys regarding online presence and hiring practices, she had some very interesting insights to share.

Read full article here…

Jun 142016
 

Injuries and violence affect everyone, regardless of age, race, or economic status. In the first half of life, more Americans die from violence and injuries — such as motor vehicle crashes, falls, or homicides — than from any other cause, including cancer, HIV, or the flu. This makes injury the leading cause of death among persons 1-44.

Injury- and violence-related deaths are only part of the problem

Nearly 199,800 deaths from injury each year—1 person every 3 minutes.1 But these deaths are on the tip of the iceberg. Each year, millions of people are injured and survive. They are faced with life-long mental, physical, and financial problems.

  • 2.5 million people were hospitalized due to injuries in 20142
  • 26.9 million people were treated in an emergency department for injuries in 20142

Injury and violence also has an alarming economic toll. The total costs of injuries and violence in the United States was $671 billion in 2013. The costs associated with fatal injuries was $214 billion while nonfatal injuries accounted for over $457 billion.3

 

Infographic: Injury and Violence in the U.S. by the Numbers

Jun 102016
 

thrift store signThis summer our thrift store is going to be having a $1 day sale every Friday. There are so many items to choose from whether you are looking for clothing, household items, toys, jewelry, books or that very retro knick knack. We are open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday & Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m..

If you haven’t been our way before, we love new customers!! You will find us @ 236 Union Street, Spartanburg, SC. We are on the corner of Union and Henry streets.

We look forward to seeing you….

May 022016
 
Support Spartanburg County is one day of online giving on Tuesday, May 3, 2016 from 12:00 a.m. until 11.59 p.m. (EST), hosted by Spartanburg County Foundation.

On that day, anyone can go to the event website, www.supportspartanburgcounty.org and donate to SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition!

All donations made during the online giving day are 100% tax deductible. Credit and debit cards are accepted.

Mark your calendar to support us on May 3rd! Be sure to tell your family, friends and co-workers, so they can too.

Profile Page Link on Support Spartanburg: https://supportspartanburgcounty.org/npo/safe-homes-rape-crisis-coalition

https://supportspartanburgcounty.org/

https://www.facebook.com/SHRCCSpartanburg/?fref=ts

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition mission is to use our collective voice to address the impact of domestic and sexual violence by providing quality services to those affected and to create social change through education, training, and activism.

What is Support Spartanburg County 2016?

The Spartanburg County Foundation (SCF) is a tax-exempt public charity, committed to improving the lives of Spartanburg County residents by promoting philanthropy, encouraging community engagement and responding to community needs.  We support the nonprofit community in Spartanburg County.

Established in 1943, The Spartanburg County Foundation is the oldest community foundation in South Carolina.  On Tuesday, May 3, 2016, community foundations across America will collectively participate in “National Give Local America Day”.  We are excited to join our peers across the country by hosting our own local Support Spartanburg County Giving
Day.

Support Spartanburg County is one day of online giving on Tuesday, May 3, 2016 from 12:00 a.m. until 11.59 p.m. (EST).  On that day, anyone can go to the event website, www.SupportSpartanburgCounty.org hosted by SCF, and donate to participating nonprofit organizations.  All donations made during the online giving day may have the opportunity to be multiplied by the incentive pool of funds.

Please support our nonprofits as they support our community.

 

Apr 262016
 

558103_613040912055248_1990709949_nDenim Day: April 27, 2016

What is Denim Day?

In 1999 an Italian Supreme Court overturned the conviction of a 45 year old driving instructor for the rape of his 18 year old student. The reason cited was the girl’s clothing. It was determined that because she wore blue jeans the instructor could not have removed them without assistance, therefore she must have consented. People everywhere were outraged and within hours prominent women within the legal community were walking the courthouse in blue jeans to protest the decision. Since that time Denim Day in LA and the USA was born. Peace Over Violence, the agency behind Denim Day, centers this campaign around the fact that a woman’s choice of clothing is no excuse for rape.

How do you participate?

Wear blue jeans on April 27, 2016
 to make a statement. As an individual you can talk about Denim Day with your friends and family. As a business or workplace you can wear blue jeans and make a small donation to the Rock the Denim Campaign to benefit the non-profits in this community that are working with victims of sexual assault every day.

If you, your business, your campus, your organization or faith-based group would like to pledge your commitment to the campaign, please fill out the linked committment forms. We will send you flyers that you can display in your workplace, school, organization or church to let those around you know that you are wearing jeans to take a stand against sexual violence.

Proceeds to benefit SAFE Homes – Rape Crisis Coalition.

Business Commitment Form

Campus Commitment Form

Faith-Based/Organization Commitment Form

Apr 022016
 

About the 2016 campaign

April is SAAM
Sexual Assault Awareness Month
Prevention is Possible


Sexual violence is a widespread problem, but the good news is it is preventable. Prevention requires many voices and roles. There are many ways individuals, communities, and the private sector can take action to promote safety, respect, and equality.


What is prevention?

       Prevention aims to stop sexual violence before it has a chance to happen. It is possible to create communities where everyone is treated with respect and equality. This can be done by promoting safe behaviors, thoughtful policies, and healthy relationships. Prevention strategies that address the root causes and social norms that allow sexual violence to exist in the first place are the most effective. This means making the connection between all forms of oppression (including racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism, adultism, ageism, and others). Oppression creates a culture in which inequality thrives and violence is seen as normal. Many communities are already reducing the risk of sexual violence through efforts that promote safety, respect, equality, and accountability.


Understanding the role of oppression

       All forms of oppression contribute to sexual violence. Oppression condones violence, uses power over others, and excuses unfair treatment and harm. Consider how sexism, racism, and transphobia are used to silence violence and abuse. What are other examples?


Prevention is everyone’s responsibility.

       What you can do

As individuals, all of us have a role to play in creating safe environments. We can all:
       • Intervene to stop problematic and disrespectful behavior
       • Promote and model healthy attitudes, behaviors, and relationships
       • Believe survivors and assist them in finding resources
       
What communities can do

Communities and organizations also have a role to play in serving as leaders on this issue by:
       • Creating and strengthening policies to promote safety, equality, and respect
       • Assessing the risks in their environment• Promoting respectful behaviors
       • Providing support for survivors
       • Holding those who harm others accountable and ensuring that appropriate treatment options are available

       What businesses can do
       • Promote prevention and support for survivors through policies and education
       • Model healthy attitudes and relationships with clients and consumers
       • Promote positive messages and behaviors through marketing campaigns and advertising content
       • Invest funding to make sexual violence prevention a social responsibility priority


Examples of prevention in action

       Employers, schools, and community settings can create proactive policies to promote a safer environment. For example:
       • Conduct trainings on how staff can contribute to positive workplace norms through bystander intervention
       • Display prevention messages and promote community resources at your school or business
       • Find resources to learn more about prevention efforts and get involved


Be a part of the solution

       The time for prevention is now. Join us in promoting safe behaviors, thoughtful policies, and healthy relationships. Your efforts are important and necessary. Together, we can create safe and equitable communities where every person is treated with respect.
       
       
Where can I learn more?

Local sexual assault centers can provide help. In crisis situations, contact 1-800-656-4673.

For more information, visit www.nsvrc.org.
Feb 172016
 

Love is Setting Boundaries: What Are My Boundaries?

For Teen DV Month, we’re talking about setting healthy boundaries in relationships. Today, we’re discussing ways to figure out your own boundaries.

When you think of a boundary, what comes to mind? You might think of something like a property line or the defining lines of a shape. Boundaries show where one thing ends and another begins. Boundaries in a relationship are kind of like this; they help each person figure out where one person ends and the other begins. In short, boundaries help you define what you are comfortable with and how you would like to be treated by others. They apply to any kind of relationship you have – whether with a friend, family member, partner or anyone else in your life.

http://www.loveisrespect.org/content/what-are-my-boundaries/