Oct 032017
 

Take A Stand is a call to action meant to bring attention to the issue of domestic violence for Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) and throughout the year.  By taking a stand we intend to remind the nation that there are still countless people–victims and survivors, their children and families, their friends and family, their communities–impacted by domestic violence.  We, all of us, should not stop until society has zero tolerance for domestic violence and until all victims and survivors can be heard.

Domestic violence thrives when we are silent; but if we take a stand and work together, we can end domestic violence. Throughout the month of October, help SHRCC to raise awareness about domestic violence and join in our efforts to end violence.

Things you can do:

  • Make a donation to SHRCC in honor of the people in your life who have been impacted by domestic violence.
  • Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram to learn more about domestic violence.
  • Wear purple — the color of Domestic Violence Awareness Month — during the month of October and use this as a way to tell others why ending domestic violence is important to you.
  • Change your social media profile and cover photos.
  • Learn more about the movement.
  • Promote Healthy Realtionships and respect in your community.
  • See if your workplace has a domestic violence program in place.
  • Learn about resources available in your community.
Oct 032017
 

We feel safer when we think domestic violence happens somewhere else to someone else.

In reality, domestic violence occurs in our neighborhoods and in our families. Anyone can be a victim of domestic violence, regardless of race, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or economic status. Abusers control and terrorize our daughters, bosses, sisters, friends, and even our sons – who are most often abused by their male partners and sometimes their female partners. While I work to end domestic violence for so many reasons and in honor of so many people, rarely a day goes by when I don’t connect the work I do to the life and experiences of my aunt; a highly respected doctor and beloved mother.

There is a myth that women who are victims must have low self-esteem, but this is exactly that: a myth. My aunt was a trail blazer. She went to medical school when most women were told that their career options were limited to nurses, secretaries or teachers (three honorable and critical fields, but a narrow list at best). When my aunt was assaulted by her former partner, she tried to get the local justice system to hold the offender accountable. When the justice system failed her, she moved 500 miles to keep her and her children safe. She testified in front of the state legislature to help improve a system that would create a safer world with effective and real protections for victims and their children.

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Oct 032017
 

OCTOBER IS DOMESTIC

VIOLENCE

AWARENESS MONTH

Please join us for the

20th Annual Silent Witness Vigil 

and speak out against domestic

violence in our community.

Thursday,

October 5, 2017

5:00-6:00 pm

Daniel Morgan Square

Main Street

Sponsored by:

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition

Seventh Circuit Solicitor’s Office

Spartanburg County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council

Spartanburg County Department of Social Services

Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office

Spartanburg Police Department

Sep 262017
 
According to the new Violence Policy Center (VPC) study When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2015 Homicide Data, South Carolina ranked fifth in the nation in the rate of women murdered by men, with a rate of 1.83 per 100,000. This annual study is released in advance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which is recognized in October.

This is the sixth year in a row that South Carolina has ranked in the top five states for women murdered by men and the rate has increased since last year’s report of 1.73 per 100,000.

“South Carolina’s continued presence at, or near, the top of the list of the most dangerous states for women demonstrates how much work as a state we still have to do,” says Sara Barber, executive director of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.

“We have changed laws but there are still struggles with consistently implementing them to increase victim safety. A long term change in our horrifying record will also need an increased emphasis on prevention education around healthy relationships. This should begin in schools and extend across all community settings, to stop this violence before it begins.”

The study uses 2015 data, the most recent year for which information is available. The study covers homicides involving one female murder victim and one male offender, and uses data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Report.

The study found that nationwide, 93 percent of women killed by men were murdered by someone they knew and that the most common weapon used was a gun.

The Violence Policy Center has published When Men Murder Women annually for 20 years. During that period, nationwide the rate of women murdered by men in single victim/single offender incidents has dropped 29 percent — from 1.57 per 100,000 in 1996 to 1.12 per 100,000 in 2015.

Below is the complete list of the states with the 10 highest rates of females murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents in 2015:

Rank   State                           Homicide Rate, Females Murdered by Males
1          Alaska                         2.86 per 100,000
2          Nevada                       2.29 per 100,000
3          Louisiana                    2.22 per 100,000
4          Tennessee                  2.10 per 100,000
5          South Carolina           1.83 per 100,000
6          Arkansas                    1.78 per 100,000
7          Kansas                       1.65 per 100,000
8          Kentucky                    1.60 per 100,000
9          Texas                         1.54 per 100,000
10 (tie) New Mexico               1.52 per 100,000
10 (tie) Missouri                     1.52 per 100,000

For each of these states, the study offers a detailed summary including: the number of victims by age group and race; the most common weapons used; the victim to offender relationships; and the circumstances of the homicides.

Nationwide, 1,686 females were murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents in 2015, at a rate of 1.12 per 100,000. Of the 1,686 female homicide victims, 1,110 were white, 476 were black, 48 were Asian or Pacific Islander, 28 were American Indian or Alaskan Native, and in 24 cases the race of the victim was not identified.

Nine out of 10 victims knew their offenders.  Of the victims who knew their offenders, 64 percent were wives or other intimate acquaintances of their killers. Fourteen times as many females were murdered by a male they knew than were killed by male strangers.

Black women are disproportionately impacted by lethal domestic violence. In 2015, black females were murdered by men at a rate of 2.43 per 100,000, more than twice the rate of 0.96 per 100,000 for white women murdered by men.
Firearms — especially handguns — were the weapons most commonly used by males to murder females in 2015.

Nationwide, for homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 55 percent of female victims were shot and killed with a gun. Of the homicides committed with guns, 69 percent were killed with handguns.

The overwhelming majority of these homicides were not related to any other felony crime, such as rape or robbery. Nationwide, for homicides in which the circumstances could be identified, 84 percent of the homicides were not related to the commission of another felony. Most often, females were killed by males in the course of an argument between the victim and the offender.

The study calculates the rate of women murdered by men by dividing the total number of females murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents by the total female population and multiplying the result by 100,000. This is the standard and accepted method of comparing fatal levels of gun violence.

The study urges state legislators to adopt laws that enhance enforcement of federal legislation and ensure that guns are surrendered by or removed from the presence of abusers.

Aug 312017
 

Right now, your teen is forming relationships that set the stage for future relationships. Given that 1 in 5 high schoolers experience dating violence, you’ll want to be sure you do your part to help your child understand what a healthy relationship feels and looks like. People define relationships in many different ways, but for a relationship to be healthy you need:

  • Safe Communication
  • Trust
  • Boundaries
  • Mutual Respect

According to Futures without Violence, the following are 10 Tips for Parents on talking about healthy relationships with teens:

  1. Encourage open, honest, and thoughtful reflection. Talk openly with teens, rather than dismissing ideas as “wrong”.
  2. Be sensitive and firm. Be willing to talk openly and respect differences of opinion.
  3. Understand teen development. Adolescence is all about experimentation. From mood swings to risk taking, “normal teenage behavior” can appear anything but normal.
  4. Teens face new and increasing pressures about sex, substance abuse and dating. Take the time to listen to them and help them think through the situations they face.
  5. Make sure teens know how you feel about disrespect, use of abusive or inappropriate language, controlling behavior, or any forms of violence.
  6. Use TV episodes, movies, music lyrics, news, community events or the experiences of friends to discuss healthy and unhealthy relationships.
  7. Teach teens how to stand-up for friends when 0bserving unhealthy treatment of peers.
  8. Have conversations that address and promote healthy relationships.
  9. Be an active participant in your young teen’s life.
  10. Be prepared that you and your teen will make mistakes, but continue to help teens make responsible choices.

The pressure to conform, negative peer and social influences, media images and messages, and acceptance of abuse and violence against identifiable groups impact how teens view others as well as their partners.  All teens need accurate information and exposure to positive models to help them strengthen their relationship skills to assist in making safe responsible choices. As a parent, you are the most important resource and advisor for your child and are instrumental in helping your child develop these skills.

For more information or tools to help you talk to your kids about healthy relationships, visit loveisrespect.org.

Aug 232017
 

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition will offer a special volunteer training program for 

domestic violence and sexual assault crisis counselors from September 5 – October 3, 2017  from 6:00pm – 9:00pm!

This volunteer job may be perfect for you!

Our agency provides a 24-hour crisis hot line for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. We serve Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union counties.

We need Volunteer Victim Advocates to be on-call after office hours, weekends and holidays during shifts they choose each month. These volunteers may also work in our emergency shelter.

Domestic Violence volunteers respond to telephone calls only. Sexual Assault volunteers respond to telephone calls and hospital referrals. Victims of sexual assault who report to law enforcement go to a local hospital for a forensic rape examination and SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition provides accompaniment and advocacy during this process.

All prospective volunteers attend an extensive 30-hour training program, every M, T & Th from 6-9pm,  to prepare them for the demands of this position. Training includes an agency overview, dynamics of domestic and sexual violence, current law, crisis intervention, shelter and hospital procedures, listening skills, and resources and referrals.

You can make a difference in the life of a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault.  Come and find out how.  For more information or to sign up for the training, contact Jamie Hughes (jamie.hughes@shrcc.org) or Karen Martin-Wilkins (karen.martinwilkins@shrcc.org) or call either @ 583-9803 .  We hope you will join us!

This training has applied for VSP certification hours through the Office of the Crime Victims’ Ombudsman and the Office of Victim Services Education and Certification (OVSEC).

Agenda will available soon!

Volunteer Application

Aug 232017
 

Uptown Sertoma Club’s (Silent & Live) Auction for a Cause “The Magic of Giving” will be held this year on November 3, 2017 at the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium.

Signature Sponsor is JM SMITH Corporation.

All proceeds from the sale of SHRCC auction items will benefit victims and families of domestic violence and sexual assault.

How it works:

From now until October 27th, SHRCC will be collecting items with a value of $50 or more for the silent auctions and items with a value of $250 or more for the live auction.  We’re looking for donations of fine jewelry, vacation rentals, gift certificates, and much more!

In addition to supporting a great cause, donations are tax deductible for the value of the item and donors will be acknowledged in the auction catalog and other promotional materials.  If you would like to help, you can drop off your new or gently used item at  our Main Office @ 236 Union Street Spartanburg, SC. For more information please e-mail jennifer.oshields@shrcc.org or call us with your questions at 864.583.9803.

Free parking, live music, food, and a cash bar for beer and wine will be available as you enjoy your shopping experience.

Tickets $20.00 in advance and $25.00 at the door (adults & children). Doors open at 5:30 p.m. A 10% buyers premium will be added to all purchases.

website: auction4acause.net

Facebook: Auction for a Cause

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Aug 222017
 


A new Spartanburg tradition continues! SpartOberfest 
is the Oktoberfest celebration for Spartanburg.  SpartOberfest will be held Sept. 14-16, 2017. It is two days of family friendly fun featuring live music and entertainment, great food, drink and our Christmas Market filled with local artisans and small businesses selling unique gifts for the holidays. Why should you attend? They are dedicating at least 10% to local organizations like SAFE Homes Rape Crisis CoalitionSt. Luke’s Free Medical Clinic, & the Spartanburg Interfaith Hospitality Network (SPIHN). By supporting SpartOtoberfest, you are helping your community and your neighbors.

This year is their 1st Vor-dem-fest concert which will be on Thursday, September 14, from 5:30 pm-8:30 pm featuring: Country music artist Morgan Riley and her band!!

To learn more, click SpartOberfest and/or go their facebook page SpartOberfest.

 

 

Aug 072017
 

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition will offer a special volunteer training program for domestic violence and sexual assault crisis counselors this September! This volunteer job may be perfect for you!

Our agency provides a 24-hour crisis hot line for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. We serve Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union counties.

We need Volunteer Victim Advocates to be on-call after office hours, weekends and holidays during shifts they choose each month. These volunteers may also work in our emergency shelter.

Domestic Violence volunteers respond to telephone calls only. Sexual Assault volunteers respond to telephone calls and hospital referrals. Victims of sexual assault who report to law enforcement go to a local hospital for a forensic rape examination and SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition provides accompaniment and advocacy during this process.

All prospective volunteers attend an extensive 30-hour training program to prepare them for the demands of this position. Training includes an agency overview, dynamics of domestic and sexual violence, current law, crisis intervention, shelter and hospital procedures, listening skills, and resources and referrals.

You can make a difference in the life of a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault. Come and find out how. Call Jamie Hughes or Karen Martin-Wilkins at 864-583-9803 for more information or to sign up for the class. We hope you will join us!