Sep 262017
 
According to the new Violence Policy Center (VPC) study When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2015 Homicide Data, South Carolina ranked fifth in the nation in the rate of women murdered by men, with a rate of 1.83 per 100,000. This annual study is released in advance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which is recognized in October.

This is the sixth year in a row that South Carolina has ranked in the top five states for women murdered by men and the rate has increased since last year’s report of 1.73 per 100,000.

“South Carolina’s continued presence at, or near, the top of the list of the most dangerous states for women demonstrates how much work as a state we still have to do,” says Sara Barber, executive director of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.

“We have changed laws but there are still struggles with consistently implementing them to increase victim safety. A long term change in our horrifying record will also need an increased emphasis on prevention education around healthy relationships. This should begin in schools and extend across all community settings, to stop this violence before it begins.”

The study uses 2015 data, the most recent year for which information is available. The study covers homicides involving one female murder victim and one male offender, and uses data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Report.

The study found that nationwide, 93 percent of women killed by men were murdered by someone they knew and that the most common weapon used was a gun.

The Violence Policy Center has published When Men Murder Women annually for 20 years. During that period, nationwide the rate of women murdered by men in single victim/single offender incidents has dropped 29 percent — from 1.57 per 100,000 in 1996 to 1.12 per 100,000 in 2015.

Below is the complete list of the states with the 10 highest rates of females murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents in 2015:

Rank   State                           Homicide Rate, Females Murdered by Males
1          Alaska                         2.86 per 100,000
2          Nevada                       2.29 per 100,000
3          Louisiana                    2.22 per 100,000
4          Tennessee                  2.10 per 100,000
5          South Carolina           1.83 per 100,000
6          Arkansas                    1.78 per 100,000
7          Kansas                       1.65 per 100,000
8          Kentucky                    1.60 per 100,000
9          Texas                         1.54 per 100,000
10 (tie) New Mexico               1.52 per 100,000
10 (tie) Missouri                     1.52 per 100,000

For each of these states, the study offers a detailed summary including: the number of victims by age group and race; the most common weapons used; the victim to offender relationships; and the circumstances of the homicides.

Nationwide, 1,686 females were murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents in 2015, at a rate of 1.12 per 100,000. Of the 1,686 female homicide victims, 1,110 were white, 476 were black, 48 were Asian or Pacific Islander, 28 were American Indian or Alaskan Native, and in 24 cases the race of the victim was not identified.

Nine out of 10 victims knew their offenders.  Of the victims who knew their offenders, 64 percent were wives or other intimate acquaintances of their killers. Fourteen times as many females were murdered by a male they knew than were killed by male strangers.

Black women are disproportionately impacted by lethal domestic violence. In 2015, black females were murdered by men at a rate of 2.43 per 100,000, more than twice the rate of 0.96 per 100,000 for white women murdered by men.
Firearms — especially handguns — were the weapons most commonly used by males to murder females in 2015.

Nationwide, for homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 55 percent of female victims were shot and killed with a gun. Of the homicides committed with guns, 69 percent were killed with handguns.

The overwhelming majority of these homicides were not related to any other felony crime, such as rape or robbery. Nationwide, for homicides in which the circumstances could be identified, 84 percent of the homicides were not related to the commission of another felony. Most often, females were killed by males in the course of an argument between the victim and the offender.

The study calculates the rate of women murdered by men by dividing the total number of females murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents by the total female population and multiplying the result by 100,000. This is the standard and accepted method of comparing fatal levels of gun violence.

The study urges state legislators to adopt laws that enhance enforcement of federal legislation and ensure that guns are surrendered by or removed from the presence of abusers.

Aug 022016
 

SAFE Homes – Rape Crisis Coalition

2016 Year End Statistics Report

  • we assisted 3,787 adults  and 1,817 children traumatized by domestic violence and sheltered 316 adults and children
  • we assisted 276 direct and 162 indirect victims of sexual assault
  • we provided 4,759 individual and 1,602 family therapy sessions for 701 people
  • we also provided 239 therapy/support groups which were attended by 265 individuals
  • we accompanied 99 victims of sexual assault to the hospital
  • we assisted 347 victims with filing order of protection petitions and attended 2,075 hearings with domestic violence and sexual assault victims
  • we provided 486 education/prevention programs reaching 78,687 individuals
  • 670 volunteers contributed 21,168 hours this year
Oct 132014
 

#SCSaysNoMore

 (Taken from SCCADVASA: SOUTH CAROLINA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC  VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT)

What is Intimate Partner Violence?

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of Americans. The term “intimate partner violence” describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy.

Violence against women is a worldwide problem including sexual violence, intimate partner violence and dating violence. These types of violence take place throughout the lifespan including child sexual abuse and abuse of elders. International efforts often use the term “gender based violence.” In the United States, a variety of terms may be used to describe intimate partner violence, including violence against women and gender-based violence.  These terms are meant to encompass all survivors of these types of violence, regardless of gender identity.

While the vast majority of men and boys do not commit sexual violence and intimate partner violence, or dating violence, the vast majority of violence against women, as well as violence against men and boys, is committed by men. The current approach to reducing and eliminating such violence is seeing men and boys are part of the solution instead of seeing them as the problem. There is a world-wide movement to engage men and boys in our work as our allies in ending violence against women.


#SCSaysNoMore in October

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault will be taking our campaign to social media. The month of October is a time where we can stand together and show that we will no longer tolerate domestic violence and that we will work together to find solutions.  Using the tag #SCSaysNoMore we will bring awareness to the numerous communities and individuals on how we as a coalition say no more to domestic violence.

We encourage direct service organizations, individuals, and community organizations to use the tag #SCSaysNoMore to join the conversation on all social media platforms.


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