May 052017
 

COLUMBIA — In a state among the worst in the nation in incidents of domestic violence, Statehouse lawmakers have taken a step toward teaching young people how to avoid such behavior.

The South Carolina Senate passed legislation this week that would allow minors as young as 16 to get a court order of protection — without their parents’ consent — when they are victims of domestic violence.

Additionally, the bill, which was approved unanimously, would create a dating violence education program for the state’s middle and high schools.

Read More…

May 012017
 


A new Spartanburg tradition continues! SpartOberfest 
is the Oktoberfest celebration for Spartanburg.  SpartOberfest will be held Sept. 14-16, 2017. It is two days of family friendly fun featuring live music and entertainment, great food, drink and our Christmas Market filled with local artisans and small businesses selling unique gifts for the holidays. Why should you attend? They are dedicating at least 10% to local organizations like SAFE Homes Rape Crisis CoalitionSt. Luke’s Free Medical Clinic, & the Spartanburg Interfaith Hospitality Network (SPIHN). By supporting SpartOtoberfest, you are helping your community and your neighbors.

This year is their 1st Vor-dem-fest concert which will be on Thursday, September 14, from 5:30 pm-8:30 pm featuring: Country music artist Morgan Riley and her band!!

To learn more, click SpartOberfest and/or go their facebook page SpartOberfest.

 

 

Oct 052016
 

by Patty Branco, Senior Technical Assistance & Resource Specialist for theNational Resource Center on Domestic Violence

This October, the Domestic Violence Awareness Project of the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) is building uponconversations from 2015around Awareness + Action = Social Change by offering key awareness activities and action steps for propelling us forward together.

We are elevating the voices of survivors, lifting up resiliency and healing as a 
transformative response to domestic violence, supporting self-care in advocacy, revisiting the passion that fuels our movement, and embracing new directions for bold and intentional social change work. Learn more!

Elevating the experiences of survivors. Recognizing domestic violence in its many forms is critical if we are to take action to effectively address and prevent it. Throughout October, our #ThisIsDV social media campaign will amplify the voices of survivors to help validate and name their experiences and raise awareness about the multifaceted nature of domestic violence.

Read More Here..

Sep 282016
 
South Carolina has moved from first in the United States for women murdered by men to 5th, with a rate of 1.73 per 100,000 in 2014 according to the new Violence Policy Center (VPC) report When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2014 Homicide DataThis is the 19th year in a row that South Carolina has ranked in the top 10 states for the rate of women murdered by men.
SEPTEMBER 2016

When Men Murder Women

An Analysis of 2014 Homicide Data

South Carolina

43 females were murdered by males in South Carolina in 2014
The homicide rate among females murdered by males in South Carolina was 1.73 per 100,000 in 2014
Ranked 5th in the United States

AGE: For homicides in which the age of the victim was reported (42 homicides), 2 victins (5 percent) were less than 18 years old and 6 victims (14 percent) were 65 years of age or older. The average age was 44 years old.

RACE: Out of 43 female homicide victims, 25 were white, 18 were black.

MOST COMMON WEAPONS: For homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 63 percent of female victims (24 out of 38) were shot and killed with guns. Of these, 71 percent (17 victims) were killed with handguns. There were 6 females killed with knives or other cutting instruments, 1 female killed by a blunt object, and 7 females killed by bodily force.

VICTIM/OFFENDER RELATIONSHIP: For homicides in which the victim to offender relationship could be identified, 93 percent of female victims (37 out of 40) were murdered by someone they knew. Three female victims were killed by strangers. Of the victims who knew their offenders, 62 percent (23 victims) were wives, common-law wives, ex-wives, or girlfriends of the offenders. Among the female intimates who were murdered, 65 percent (15 victims) were killed with guns; 73 percent of these (11 victims) were shot and killed with handguns.

CIRCUMSTANCE: For homicides in which the circumstances could be identified, 61 percent (17 out of 28) were not related to the commission of any other felony. Of these, 82 percent (14 homicides) involved arguments between the victim and the offender.

 

To view the 2016 report, please visit, men-murder-pic-2016When Men Murder Women an Analysis of 2014 Homicide Data

COPYRIGHT AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Copyright © September 2016 Violence Policy Center The Violence Policy Center (VPC) is a national nonprofit educational organization that conducts research and public education on violence in America and provides information and analysis to policymakers, journalists, advocates, and the general public. This study was funded with the support of The Herb Block Foundation and The Joyce Foundation. When Men Murder Women was also supported by a generous gift from Lawrence Stephanson. For a complete list of VPC publications with document links, please visit http://www.vpc.org/publications.

 
Aug 022016
 

SAFE Homes – Rape Crisis Coalition

2016 Year End Statistics Report

  • we assisted 3,787 adults  and 1,817 children traumatized by domestic violence and sheltered 316 adults and children
  • we assisted 276 direct and 162 indirect victims of sexual assault
  • we provided 4,759 individual and 1,602 family therapy sessions for 701 people
  • we also provided 239 therapy/support groups which were attended by 265 individuals
  • we accompanied 99 victims of sexual assault to the hospital
  • we assisted 347 victims with filing order of protection petitions and attended 2,075 hearings with domestic violence and sexual assault victims
  • we provided 486 education/prevention programs reaching 78,687 individuals
  • 670 volunteers contributed 21,168 hours this year
Oct 132014
 

#SCSaysNoMore

 (Taken from SCCADVASA: SOUTH CAROLINA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC  VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT)

What is Intimate Partner Violence?

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of Americans. The term “intimate partner violence” describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy.

Violence against women is a worldwide problem including sexual violence, intimate partner violence and dating violence. These types of violence take place throughout the lifespan including child sexual abuse and abuse of elders. International efforts often use the term “gender based violence.” In the United States, a variety of terms may be used to describe intimate partner violence, including violence against women and gender-based violence.  These terms are meant to encompass all survivors of these types of violence, regardless of gender identity.

While the vast majority of men and boys do not commit sexual violence and intimate partner violence, or dating violence, the vast majority of violence against women, as well as violence against men and boys, is committed by men. The current approach to reducing and eliminating such violence is seeing men and boys are part of the solution instead of seeing them as the problem. There is a world-wide movement to engage men and boys in our work as our allies in ending violence against women.


#SCSaysNoMore in October

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault will be taking our campaign to social media. The month of October is a time where we can stand together and show that we will no longer tolerate domestic violence and that we will work together to find solutions.  Using the tag #SCSaysNoMore we will bring awareness to the numerous communities and individuals on how we as a coalition say no more to domestic violence.

We encourage direct service organizations, individuals, and community organizations to use the tag #SCSaysNoMore to join the conversation on all social media platforms.


Descriptions and Statistics: Domestic Violence

Descriptions and Statistics: Sexual Assault

Descriptions and Statistics: Teen Dating Violence

Statewide Events

Intervention

Prevention

Marginalized Survivors

Social Media