Mar 022017
 

Full Time Outreach Educator needed to provide domestic and sexual violence education/prevention programs to under served populations in Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union Counties.
Responsibilities include public speaking targeting rural, LGBTQ, disabled, elderly and non-english speaking youth and adults within community and school based settings.
Requires a Bachelors Degree, non-judgmental attitude, valid SC drivers license. Must pass a SLED check. Men are encouraged to apply.
Submit Application at SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition
236 Union Street
Spartanburg, SC 29302 or
lynn.hawkins@shrcc.org
No Phone Calls Please
EOE

SHRCC Application

Feb 142017
 

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition will offer a special volunteer training program for domestic violence and sexual assault crisis counselors beginning March 6, 2017 – March 28, 2017

This volunteer job may be perfect for you!

Our agency provides a 24-hour crisis hot line for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. We serve Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union counties.

We need Volunteer Victim Advocates to be on-call after office hours, weekends and holidays during shifts they choose each month. These volunteers may also work in our emergency shelter.

Domestic Violence volunteers respond to telephone calls only. Sexual Assault volunteers respond to telephone calls and hospital referrals. Victims of sexual assault who report to law enforcement go to a local hospital for a forensic rape examination and SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition provides accompaniment and advocacy during this process.

All prospective volunteers attend an extensive 30-hour training program to prepare them for the demands of this position. Training includes an agency overview, dynamics of domestic and sexual violence, current law, crisis intervention, shelter and hospital procedures, listening skills, and resources and referrals.

You can make a difference in the life of a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault.  Come and find out how.  For more information or to sign up for the training, email Jamie Hughes @ (jamie.hughes@shrcc.org) or Karen Martin-Wilkins (karen.martinwilkins@shrcc.org) or call @ 583-9803 .  We hope you will join us!

This training has applied for VSP certification hours through the Office of the Crime Victims’ Ombudsman and the Office of Victim Services Education and Certification (OVSEC).

Draft of 2017 Volunteer Training Schedule

Feb 022017
 

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month! Teen DV Month (sometimes called TDVAM) is a national effort to raise awareness about abuse in teen and 20-something relationships and promote programs that prevent it.

Dating violence is more common than many people think. One in three teens in the U.S. will experience physical, sexual or emotional abuse by someone they are in a relationship with before they become adults. Help us spread awareness and stop dating abuse before it starts!

In February 2017, loveisrespect will be celebrating its 10th anniversary! So, we thought we’d get back to basics. Our theme for Teen DV Month 2017 is Love is . . . Respect. We’ll be talking about what respect means and why it’s so important in a healthy relationship – online and off. We hope you’ll join the conversation!

Love is Respect TDVAM

Jan 032017
 

Please Join SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition for our 1st Annual 1BlueStringHubCity Awareness Campaign & Competition

This competition is made possible by The Star and The Rosemary Antosh Charitable Fund

1BlueStringHubCityis a singer/songwriter competition for artists in Spartanburg and surrounding areas. Contestants will need to submit an original piece focused on this year’s theme; HOPE. Judges will score each entry and select only 6 finalists. On April 7th, 2017, the 6 finalists will perform their song during a live, public concert @ USC Upstate. Concert goers will vote and decide the winner!

Online registration opened January 1, 2017 and will close February 12, 2017. Finalists will be announced in March. The winning prize package includes cash, studio time, and spotlight performance slots.

1bluestring.orgis an awareness campaign founded by 1in6.org. The mission of 1in6 is to help men who have had unwanted or abusive sexual experiences live healthier, happier lives.

What does HOPE mean to you? Where do you turn for HOPE? What gives you HOPE? Was there a time when you didn’t have HOPE? How do you inspire HOPE in others? Tell us about it. As a matter of fact, write a song and sing about it! Be creative – be original!

Contestants may visit 1BlueStringHubCity.com for registration information. Tickets for the finale are only $6 and may be ordered online or purchased at the door.

For more information, contact Jamie Hughes at 864.583.9803 or jamie.hughes@shrcc.org.

If you need help, please call our hotline number @864-583-9803 or toll free @ 800-273-5066.

Oct 052016
 

by Patty Branco, Senior Technical Assistance & Resource Specialist for theNational Resource Center on Domestic Violence

This October, the Domestic Violence Awareness Project of the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) is building uponconversations from 2015around Awareness + Action = Social Change by offering key awareness activities and action steps for propelling us forward together.

We are elevating the voices of survivors, lifting up resiliency and healing as a 
transformative response to domestic violence, supporting self-care in advocacy, revisiting the passion that fuels our movement, and embracing new directions for bold and intentional social change work. Learn more!

Elevating the experiences of survivors. Recognizing domestic violence in its many forms is critical if we are to take action to effectively address and prevent it. Throughout October, our #ThisIsDV social media campaign will amplify the voices of survivors to help validate and name their experiences and raise awareness about the multifaceted nature of domestic violence.

Read More Here..

Sep 282016
 
South Carolina has moved from first in the United States for women murdered by men to 5th, with a rate of 1.73 per 100,000 in 2014 according to the new Violence Policy Center (VPC) report When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2014 Homicide DataThis is the 19th year in a row that South Carolina has ranked in the top 10 states for the rate of women murdered by men.
SEPTEMBER 2016

When Men Murder Women

An Analysis of 2014 Homicide Data

South Carolina

43 females were murdered by males in South Carolina in 2014
The homicide rate among females murdered by males in South Carolina was 1.73 per 100,000 in 2014
Ranked 5th in the United States

AGE: For homicides in which the age of the victim was reported (42 homicides), 2 victins (5 percent) were less than 18 years old and 6 victims (14 percent) were 65 years of age or older. The average age was 44 years old.

RACE: Out of 43 female homicide victims, 25 were white, 18 were black.

MOST COMMON WEAPONS: For homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 63 percent of female victims (24 out of 38) were shot and killed with guns. Of these, 71 percent (17 victims) were killed with handguns. There were 6 females killed with knives or other cutting instruments, 1 female killed by a blunt object, and 7 females killed by bodily force.

VICTIM/OFFENDER RELATIONSHIP: For homicides in which the victim to offender relationship could be identified, 93 percent of female victims (37 out of 40) were murdered by someone they knew. Three female victims were killed by strangers. Of the victims who knew their offenders, 62 percent (23 victims) were wives, common-law wives, ex-wives, or girlfriends of the offenders. Among the female intimates who were murdered, 65 percent (15 victims) were killed with guns; 73 percent of these (11 victims) were shot and killed with handguns.

CIRCUMSTANCE: For homicides in which the circumstances could be identified, 61 percent (17 out of 28) were not related to the commission of any other felony. Of these, 82 percent (14 homicides) involved arguments between the victim and the offender.

 

To view the 2016 report, please visit, men-murder-pic-2016When Men Murder Women an Analysis of 2014 Homicide Data

COPYRIGHT AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Copyright © September 2016 Violence Policy Center The Violence Policy Center (VPC) is a national nonprofit educational organization that conducts research and public education on violence in America and provides information and analysis to policymakers, journalists, advocates, and the general public. This study was funded with the support of The Herb Block Foundation and The Joyce Foundation. When Men Murder Women was also supported by a generous gift from Lawrence Stephanson. For a complete list of VPC publications with document links, please visit http://www.vpc.org/publications.

 
Aug 022016
 

SAFE Homes – Rape Crisis Coalition

2015 Year End Statistics Report

  • we assisted 4,473 adults  and 2,253 children traumatized by domestic violence and sheltered 304 adults and children
  • we assisted 219 direct and 147 indirect victims of sexual assault
  • we provided 4,002 individual and 1,386 family therapy sessions for 623 people
  • we also provided 180 therapy/support groups which were attended by 205 individuals
  • we accompanied 116 victims of sexual assault to the hospital
  • we assisted 408 victims with filing order of protection petitions and attended 2,883 hearings with domestic violence and sexual assault victims
  • we provided 463 education/prevention programs reaching 171,557 individuals
  • 681 volunteers contributed 24,021.75 hours this year
Oct 132014
 

#SCSaysNoMore

 (Taken from SCCADVASA: SOUTH CAROLINA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC  VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT)

What is Intimate Partner Violence?

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of Americans. The term “intimate partner violence” describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy.

Violence against women is a worldwide problem including sexual violence, intimate partner violence and dating violence. These types of violence take place throughout the lifespan including child sexual abuse and abuse of elders. International efforts often use the term “gender based violence.” In the United States, a variety of terms may be used to describe intimate partner violence, including violence against women and gender-based violence.  These terms are meant to encompass all survivors of these types of violence, regardless of gender identity.

While the vast majority of men and boys do not commit sexual violence and intimate partner violence, or dating violence, the vast majority of violence against women, as well as violence against men and boys, is committed by men. The current approach to reducing and eliminating such violence is seeing men and boys are part of the solution instead of seeing them as the problem. There is a world-wide movement to engage men and boys in our work as our allies in ending violence against women.


#SCSaysNoMore in October

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault will be taking our campaign to social media. The month of October is a time where we can stand together and show that we will no longer tolerate domestic violence and that we will work together to find solutions.  Using the tag #SCSaysNoMore we will bring awareness to the numerous communities and individuals on how we as a coalition say no more to domestic violence.

We encourage direct service organizations, individuals, and community organizations to use the tag #SCSaysNoMore to join the conversation on all social media platforms.


Descriptions and Statistics: Domestic Violence

Descriptions and Statistics: Sexual Assault

Descriptions and Statistics: Teen Dating Violence

Statewide Events

Intervention

Prevention

Marginalized Survivors

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