Nov 272018
 

Christmas is right around the corner, and so is theThe Shop Motorcycle Club‘s TOY POKER RUN benefiting SHRCC Spartanburg and the victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse that we serve in our community…men, women and children alike. So rev up those engines, and join us SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 (rain date December 8).

1st Bike Out – 11:00 am
Last Bike Out – 1:00 pm
Parade with Santa departs promptly at 3:00 pm from 4th draw stop Grille 221 on Hwy 221 to Mid-City Shrine Club.
🃏$25 Joker Instant Win at each stop🃏

Poker Run Entry: New Toys/Games or Cash Donations
One Hand Per Rider With Donation (All Motorcycles & Vehicles Welcome).

Cash prizes for Best and Worst Hands 💵 breakfast 🍳 live entertainment 🎶 parade with Santa 🎅 and more!!!

FOR MORE INFO: Willie: 864-542-5610 OR Tennessee: 864-921-5086

Oct 082018
 
According to the new Violence Policy Center (VPC) study When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2016 Homicide Data, South Carolina ranked sixth in the nation in the rate of women murdered by men, with a rate of 1.83 per 100,000. This annual study is released in advance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which is recognized in October.
SOUTH CAROLINA
48 females were murdered by males in South Carolina in 2016
The homicide rate among females murdered by males in South Carolina was 1.88 per 100,000 in 2016
Ranked 6th in the United States
AGE
For homicides in which the age of the victim was reported (48 homicides), 3 victims (6 percent) were less than
18 years old, and 3 victims (6 percent) were 65 years of age or older. The average age was 40 years old.
RACE
Out of 48 female homicide victims, 24 were white, 23 were black, and 1 was of unknown race.
MOST COMMON WEAPONS
For homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 59 percent of female victims (26 out of 44)
were shot and killed with guns. Of these, 54 percent (14 victims) were killed with handguns. There were 5
females killed with knives or other cutting instruments, 4 females killed by a blunt object, and 8 females
killed by bodily force.
VICTIM/OFFENDER RELATIONSHIP
For homicides in which the victim to offender relationship could be identified, 95 percent of female victims (42
out of 44) were murdered by someone they knew. Two female victims were killed by strangers. Of the victims
who knew their offenders, 69 percent (29 victims) were wives, common-law wives, ex-wives, or girlfriends of
the offenders. Among the female intimates who were murdered, 66 percent (19 victims) were killed with guns;
53 percent of these (10 victims) were shot and killed with handguns.
CIRCUMSTANCE
For homicides in which the circumstances could be identified, 88 percent (28 out of 32) were not related to the
commission of any other felony. Of these, 71 percent (20 homicides) involved arguments between the victim
and the offender.
Aug 152018
 
Our volunteer advocate program is one of the most crucial aspects of our organization. Volunteer advocates answer our 24/7 crisis hotline and accompany sexual assault victims at the hospital. These advocates help connect victims to our resources and to other resources in the community.
If you are interested in joining this dedicated, talented team of volunteers, the process is simple!
Begin by calling our volunteer coordinator, Julia Hogan, at 864-583-9803. Together, you will set up a time and date to come to our main office for a short interview and some paperwork.
After that, you will have access to our online training course. Our online course is 33 hours long and can be completed from the comfort of your own home. If there are any questions or issues, our staff will be available to help guide you.
Once you have finished the online portion, you must attend a half-day, hands-on workshop. These workshops will be held every eight weeks and will give you a chance to go over everything you learned in the class and apply it to real-life situations.
Our crisis line volunteers answered 1,230 calls last year alone. We could not help so many survivors in our community with out their talent, dedication, and empathy. If you would like to join us in the battle to end sexual violence in the upstate, please call 864-583-9803 today.

Volunteer Application

Aug 142018
 

With School starting, we wanted to get out our list of items we need for the children we serve @ SHRCC. All donations are tax deductible and we can count the hours you spent shopping.  Thank you for thinking of our kids and know your donation will make a difference! 

 2018 School Supply Wish List

  • Backpacks (various sizes/colors) – Specifically need for teens
  • Nylon zipper pencil pouches
  • Calculators
  • Pencil sharpeners
  • Highlighters
  • Colored pencils
  • Markers (thin & thick)
  • Crayons
  • Notebook paper
  • Graph paper
  • 2-pocket folders w/prongs
  • Composition (Marbled) notebooks – black and white
  • Spiral notebooks
  • Sticky Notes
  • Dividers
  • Binders (various sizes)
  • Blue/black pens
  • Sharpened pencils #2
  • Glue sticks
  • Hand sanitizer (small/travel)
  • Kleenex
  • Rulers (plastic)
  • Fiskar scissors
  • Flash drives
  • Ear buds or Head phones
  • Clorox Wipes
  • Quart & Gallon size baggies

 

If you are able to donate any of these items, please bring them to our main office:
SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition
236 Union Street  Spartanburg, SC
864-583-9803
Office hours: Monday-Friday  8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

 

 

Aug 022018
 

SAFE Homes – Rape Crisis Coalition

2017 Year End Statistics Report

  • we assisted 2,565 adults and 1,273 children traumatized by domestic violence and sheltered 354 adults and children
  • we assisted 315 direct and 141 indirect  victims of sexual assault
  • we provided 4,698 individual  and 1,636 family therapy sessions for 624 people
  • we also provided 232 therapy/support groups  which were attended by 259 individuals
  • we accompanied 103 victims of sexual assault to the hospital
  • we assisted 328 victims with filing order of protection petitions and attended 1,363 hearings with domestic violence and sexual assault victims
  • we provided 633 education/prevention programs reaching 134,367 individuals
  • 2,031 volunteers contributed 26,611 hours this year
Jun 062018
 

Hours: Primarily weekends and holidays – all 3 shifts.

Work approximately 15-20 hours week

Salary: $9.00 hour

Requires: Minimum of high school diploma, BA degree preferred. Must be compassionate, understand issues domestic violence victims face, and have some computer skills.

Resumes or Applications accepted at

236 Union Street

Spartanburg, SC 29302

Email: Lynn Hawkins @ lynn.hawkins@shrcc.org

No Phone Calls Please

EOE

Oct 132014
 

#SCSaysNoMore

 (Taken from SCCADVASA: SOUTH CAROLINA COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC  VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT)

What is Intimate Partner Violence?

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention defines intimate partner violence (IPV) as a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of Americans. The term “intimate partner violence” describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy.

Violence against women is a worldwide problem including sexual violence, intimate partner violence and dating violence. These types of violence take place throughout the lifespan including child sexual abuse and abuse of elders. International efforts often use the term “gender based violence.” In the United States, a variety of terms may be used to describe intimate partner violence, including violence against women and gender-based violence.  These terms are meant to encompass all survivors of these types of violence, regardless of gender identity.

While the vast majority of men and boys do not commit sexual violence and intimate partner violence, or dating violence, the vast majority of violence against women, as well as violence against men and boys, is committed by men. The current approach to reducing and eliminating such violence is seeing men and boys are part of the solution instead of seeing them as the problem. There is a world-wide movement to engage men and boys in our work as our allies in ending violence against women.


#SCSaysNoMore in October

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault will be taking our campaign to social media. The month of October is a time where we can stand together and show that we will no longer tolerate domestic violence and that we will work together to find solutions.  Using the tag #SCSaysNoMore we will bring awareness to the numerous communities and individuals on how we as a coalition say no more to domestic violence.

We encourage direct service organizations, individuals, and community organizations to use the tag #SCSaysNoMore to join the conversation on all social media platforms.


Descriptions and Statistics: Domestic Violence

Descriptions and Statistics: Sexual Assault

Descriptions and Statistics: Teen Dating Violence

Statewide Events

Intervention

Prevention

Marginalized Survivors

Social Media