Apr 022016
 

About the 2016 campaign

April is SAAM
Sexual Assault Awareness Month
Prevention is Possible


Sexual violence is a widespread problem, but the good news is it is preventable. Prevention requires many voices and roles. There are many ways individuals, communities, and the private sector can take action to promote safety, respect, and equality.


What is prevention?

       Prevention aims to stop sexual violence before it has a chance to happen. It is possible to create communities where everyone is treated with respect and equality. This can be done by promoting safe behaviors, thoughtful policies, and healthy relationships. Prevention strategies that address the root causes and social norms that allow sexual violence to exist in the first place are the most effective. This means making the connection between all forms of oppression (including racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism, adultism, ageism, and others). Oppression creates a culture in which inequality thrives and violence is seen as normal. Many communities are already reducing the risk of sexual violence through efforts that promote safety, respect, equality, and accountability.


Understanding the role of oppression

       All forms of oppression contribute to sexual violence. Oppression condones violence, uses power over others, and excuses unfair treatment and harm. Consider how sexism, racism, and transphobia are used to silence violence and abuse. What are other examples?


Prevention is everyone’s responsibility.

       What you can do

As individuals, all of us have a role to play in creating safe environments. We can all:
       • Intervene to stop problematic and disrespectful behavior
       • Promote and model healthy attitudes, behaviors, and relationships
       • Believe survivors and assist them in finding resources
       
What communities can do

Communities and organizations also have a role to play in serving as leaders on this issue by:
       • Creating and strengthening policies to promote safety, equality, and respect
       • Assessing the risks in their environment• Promoting respectful behaviors
       • Providing support for survivors
       • Holding those who harm others accountable and ensuring that appropriate treatment options are available

       What businesses can do
       • Promote prevention and support for survivors through policies and education
       • Model healthy attitudes and relationships with clients and consumers
       • Promote positive messages and behaviors through marketing campaigns and advertising content
       • Invest funding to make sexual violence prevention a social responsibility priority


Examples of prevention in action

       Employers, schools, and community settings can create proactive policies to promote a safer environment. For example:
       • Conduct trainings on how staff can contribute to positive workplace norms through bystander intervention
       • Display prevention messages and promote community resources at your school or business
       • Find resources to learn more about prevention efforts and get involved


Be a part of the solution

       The time for prevention is now. Join us in promoting safe behaviors, thoughtful policies, and healthy relationships. Your efforts are important and necessary. Together, we can create safe and equitable communities where every person is treated with respect.
       
       
Where can I learn more?

Local sexual assault centers can provide help. In crisis situations, contact 1-800-656-4673.

For more information, visit www.nsvrc.org.
Jan 082016
 

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition will offer a special volunteer training program for domestic violence and sexual assault crisis counselors beginning March 14, 2016 – April 5, 2016! Agenda coming soon!!!!

This volunteer job may be perfect for you!

Our agency provides a 24-hour crisis hot line for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. We serve Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union counties.

We need Volunteer Victim Advocates to be on-call after office hours, weekends and holidays during shifts they choose each month. These volunteers may also work in our emergency shelter.

Domestic Violence volunteers respond to telephone calls only. Sexual Assault volunteers respond to telephone calls and hospital referrals. Victims of sexual assault who report to law enforcement go to a local hospital for a forensic rape examination and SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition provides accompaniment and advocacy during this process.

All prospective volunteers attend an extensive 30-hour training program to prepare them for the demands of this position. Training includes an agency overview, dynamics of domestic and sexual violence, current law, crisis intervention, shelter and hospital procedures, listening skills, and resources and referrals.

You can make a difference in the life of a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault.  Come and find out how.  Call Jamie Hughes or Karen Martin-Wilkins at 583-9803 for more information or to sign up for the class.  We hope you will join us!

This training has applied for VSP certification hours through the Office of the Crime Victims’Ombudsman and the Office of Victim Services Education and Certification (OVSEC).

 

 

 

 

Aug 272012
 

United We Stand…Putting the Pieces Together

(An Interpersonal Violence Conference)

Friday, October 5, 2012

8:30 a.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Marriott Spartanburg at Renaissance Park

Featured Speaker:  Lt. Mike Prodane, BS

Behavioral Science Unit

South Carolina State Law Enforcement Division

(CE, Nursing Contact Hours, Social Work, Counselors, Victim Service Providers, Law Enforcement Officers, and Judges Credits Approved)

Scholarships are available to this conference.

Registration Fee is $75.00; Additional fee after September 21, 2012: $15.00

Fee includes light continental breakfast, handout materials,

refreshments, lunch, and certificate of attendance.

Deadline for registration is September 21, 2012;

No refunds will be made. Substitutions are accepted and encouraged.

For more information contact Marlene Evans or Jennifer O’Shields

at 864.583.9803 or 1.800.273.5066.

United We Stand Brochure

United We Stand Agenda Insert

Apr 022012
 

In our country, a child is abused or neglected every 36 seconds, and, according to the Department of Health and Human Services, only 40 percent of abused children receive the services they need. The Protect Our Kids Act can be the catalyst we need to begin to speak out more effectively for children who cannot speak up on their own. This April, as we mark National Child Abuse Prevention Month, I hope more and more of our colleagues will join me and Senator Collins in this first step to end this national abomination once and for all.

To read more of this article, click here.

Mar 222012
 

Sexual violence is an issue that affects everyone in a community regardless of age. All of us have a role in building safe, healthy relationships and communities. Promoting such relationships begins by strengthening communication and instilling respect for   self and others in our children.

Healthy sexuality is emotional, social, cultural and physical.  It is our values, attitudes, feelings, interactions and behaviors. It changes with time and experience.

Some of the topics to be covered are:

  • Why it’s important to talk with our children
  • Modeling and promoting healthy boundaries
  • Protecting children from sexual predators
  • Our role in prevention
  • Healthy relationship choices

Monday April 23, 2012

6:00pm – 7:00pm

Spartanburg Library Headquarters

Hoechst-Celanese Room

For adults talking with  children ages infant – 11

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Monday April 30, 2012

6:00pm – 7:00pm

Spartanburg Library Headquarters

Hoechst-Celanese Room

For adults talking with  children ages 12-17

For more information or to register, please call Danielle Spakes @ 864.583.9803 or danielle.spakes@shrcc.org.

 

Mar 232011
 

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition will offer a special volunteer training program for domestic violence and sexual assault crisis counselors beginning March 5, 2012!

This volunteer job may be perfect for you! Our agency provides a 24-hour crisis hot line for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. We serve Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union counties.We need Volunteer Victim Advocates to be on-call after office hours, on weekends, and holidays during shifts they choose each month.

Domestic Violence volunteers respond to telephone calls only. Sexual Assault volunteers respond to telephone calls and hospital referrals. Victims of sexual assault who report to law enforcement go to a local hospital for a forensic rape examination and SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition provides accompaniment and advocacy during this process.

All prospective volunteers attend an extensive 30-hour training program to prepare them for the demands of this position. Training includes an agency overview, dynamics of domestic and sexual violence, current law, crisis intervention, shelter and hospital procedures, listening skills, and resources and referrals.

You can make a difference in the life of a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault. Come and find out how.

Call Karen Martin-Wilkins at 583-9803 for more information or to sign up for the class. We hope you will join us!

SHRCC Volunteer Training Program Agenda

Mar 172011
 

We are revamping and rescheduling our psychotherapy support groups for survivors

Tuesday 4:30pm-6:00pm DV Support Group for Adults with Susan Luna

Tuesday 4:30pm-6:00pm Sexual Violence Recovery Group with Elizabeth Pratt

Tuesday 4:30pm-6:00pm DV Support Group for Kids with Pam Jobe

Thursday 4:30pm-6:00pm Interpersonal Violence Support Group for LGBT Clients with Elizabeth Pratt

These groups are open by referral from a staff therapist or by assessment with Elizabeth Pratt

Please contact Ms. Pratt for more information at 864.583.9803