Oct 032017
 

OCTOBER IS DOMESTIC

VIOLENCE

AWARENESS MONTH

Please join us for the

20th Annual Silent Witness Vigil 

and speak out against domestic

violence in our community.

Thursday,

October 5, 2017

5:00-6:00 pm

Daniel Morgan Square

Main Street

Sponsored by:

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition

Seventh Circuit Solicitor’s Office

Spartanburg County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council

Spartanburg County Department of Social Services

Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office

Spartanburg Police Department

Sep 262017
 
According to the new Violence Policy Center (VPC) study When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2015 Homicide Data, South Carolina ranked fifth in the nation in the rate of women murdered by men, with a rate of 1.83 per 100,000. This annual study is released in advance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which is recognized in October.

This is the sixth year in a row that South Carolina has ranked in the top five states for women murdered by men and the rate has increased since last year’s report of 1.73 per 100,000.

“South Carolina’s continued presence at, or near, the top of the list of the most dangerous states for women demonstrates how much work as a state we still have to do,” says Sara Barber, executive director of the South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.

“We have changed laws but there are still struggles with consistently implementing them to increase victim safety. A long term change in our horrifying record will also need an increased emphasis on prevention education around healthy relationships. This should begin in schools and extend across all community settings, to stop this violence before it begins.”

The study uses 2015 data, the most recent year for which information is available. The study covers homicides involving one female murder victim and one male offender, and uses data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Report.

The study found that nationwide, 93 percent of women killed by men were murdered by someone they knew and that the most common weapon used was a gun.

The Violence Policy Center has published When Men Murder Women annually for 20 years. During that period, nationwide the rate of women murdered by men in single victim/single offender incidents has dropped 29 percent — from 1.57 per 100,000 in 1996 to 1.12 per 100,000 in 2015.

Below is the complete list of the states with the 10 highest rates of females murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents in 2015:

Rank   State                           Homicide Rate, Females Murdered by Males
1          Alaska                         2.86 per 100,000
2          Nevada                       2.29 per 100,000
3          Louisiana                    2.22 per 100,000
4          Tennessee                  2.10 per 100,000
5          South Carolina           1.83 per 100,000
6          Arkansas                    1.78 per 100,000
7          Kansas                       1.65 per 100,000
8          Kentucky                    1.60 per 100,000
9          Texas                         1.54 per 100,000
10 (tie) New Mexico               1.52 per 100,000
10 (tie) Missouri                     1.52 per 100,000

For each of these states, the study offers a detailed summary including: the number of victims by age group and race; the most common weapons used; the victim to offender relationships; and the circumstances of the homicides.

Nationwide, 1,686 females were murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents in 2015, at a rate of 1.12 per 100,000. Of the 1,686 female homicide victims, 1,110 were white, 476 were black, 48 were Asian or Pacific Islander, 28 were American Indian or Alaskan Native, and in 24 cases the race of the victim was not identified.

Nine out of 10 victims knew their offenders.  Of the victims who knew their offenders, 64 percent were wives or other intimate acquaintances of their killers. Fourteen times as many females were murdered by a male they knew than were killed by male strangers.

Black women are disproportionately impacted by lethal domestic violence. In 2015, black females were murdered by men at a rate of 2.43 per 100,000, more than twice the rate of 0.96 per 100,000 for white women murdered by men.
Firearms — especially handguns — were the weapons most commonly used by males to murder females in 2015.

Nationwide, for homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 55 percent of female victims were shot and killed with a gun. Of the homicides committed with guns, 69 percent were killed with handguns.

The overwhelming majority of these homicides were not related to any other felony crime, such as rape or robbery. Nationwide, for homicides in which the circumstances could be identified, 84 percent of the homicides were not related to the commission of another felony. Most often, females were killed by males in the course of an argument between the victim and the offender.

The study calculates the rate of women murdered by men by dividing the total number of females murdered by males in single victim/single offender incidents by the total female population and multiplying the result by 100,000. This is the standard and accepted method of comparing fatal levels of gun violence.

The study urges state legislators to adopt laws that enhance enforcement of federal legislation and ensure that guns are surrendered by or removed from the presence of abusers.

Aug 232017
 

Uptown Sertoma Club’s (Silent & Live) Auction for a Cause “The Magic of Giving” will be held this year on November 3, 2017 at the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium.

Signature Sponsor is JM SMITH Corporation.

All proceeds from the sale of SHRCC auction items will benefit victims and families of domestic violence and sexual assault.

How it works:

From now until October 27th, SHRCC will be collecting items with a value of $50 or more for the silent auctions and items with a value of $250 or more for the live auction.  We’re looking for donations of fine jewelry, vacation rentals, gift certificates, and much more!

In addition to supporting a great cause, donations are tax deductible for the value of the item and donors will be acknowledged in the auction catalog and other promotional materials.  If you would like to help, you can drop off your new or gently used item at  our Main Office @ 236 Union Street Spartanburg, SC. For more information please e-mail jennifer.oshields@shrcc.org or call us with your questions at 864.583.9803.

Free parking, live music, food, and a cash bar for beer and wine will be available as you enjoy your shopping experience.

Tickets $20.00 in advance and $25.00 at the door (adults & children). Doors open at 5:30 p.m. A 10% buyers premium will be added to all purchases.

website: auction4acause.net

Facebook: Auction for a Cause

 Posted by at 12:00 am
May 052017
 

COLUMBIA — In a state among the worst in the nation in incidents of domestic violence, Statehouse lawmakers have taken a step toward teaching young people how to avoid such behavior.

The South Carolina Senate passed legislation this week that would allow minors as young as 16 to get a court order of protection — without their parents’ consent — when they are victims of domestic violence.

Additionally, the bill, which was approved unanimously, would create a dating violence education program for the state’s middle and high schools.

Read More…

Nov 232016
 

Join The Shop & SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition

for the 17th Annual Toy Poker Run

December 3th, 2016

Rain Date:  December 10th, 2016

            Registration at The Shop Clubhouse – “breakfast available”
521 New Cut Road, Una SC
 Last Card at Mid City Shrine Club
1470 Fort Prince Blvd
Wellford, SC
Entertainment – Anna Leigh Band
First Bike Out – 11:00 am
Last Bike Out – 1:00 pm
$25 Joker at each stop – Good Luck!
 Parade with Santa departs promptly at 3:00 pm from 4th draw stop 

@ Grille 221 on Hwy 211 – Spartanburg, SC

Last Card Drawn @ Mid City Shrine Club. 
    Poker Run Entry: New Toys/Games or Cash Donations
    One hand per rider with donation – All Motorcycles & Vehicles Welcome
   For information:  Willie: 542-5610, Tennessee: 921-5086
or info@theshopshots.com
                                            Cash Prizes for Best Hand -$400                                        
2nd Best Hand- $200
& Worst Hand – $100
Jan 082016
 

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition will offer a special volunteer training program for domestic violence and sexual assault crisis counselors beginning March 14, 2016 – April 5, 2016! Agenda coming soon!!!!

This volunteer job may be perfect for you!

Our agency provides a 24-hour crisis hot line for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. We serve Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union counties.

We need Volunteer Victim Advocates to be on-call after office hours, weekends and holidays during shifts they choose each month. These volunteers may also work in our emergency shelter.

Domestic Violence volunteers respond to telephone calls only. Sexual Assault volunteers respond to telephone calls and hospital referrals. Victims of sexual assault who report to law enforcement go to a local hospital for a forensic rape examination and SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition provides accompaniment and advocacy during this process.

All prospective volunteers attend an extensive 30-hour training program to prepare them for the demands of this position. Training includes an agency overview, dynamics of domestic and sexual violence, current law, crisis intervention, shelter and hospital procedures, listening skills, and resources and referrals.

You can make a difference in the life of a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault.  Come and find out how.  Call Jamie Hughes or Karen Martin-Wilkins at 583-9803 for more information or to sign up for the class.  We hope you will join us!

This training has applied for VSP certification hours through the Office of the Crime Victims’Ombudsman and the Office of Victim Services Education and Certification (OVSEC).

 

 

 

 

Aug 202015
 

Join us for our 11th annual interpersonal violence conference in our new location……

Friday, October 23, 2015 ~ 7:30 am – 4:30 pm

Family Life Center

First Presbyterian Church

393 East Main Street

Spartanburg, SC 29302

Oct 23, 2015 Agenda Insert

Oct 23, 2015 Brochure

You can register on-line, request a brochure via email or pick up a brochure at SHRCC.

On-line registration: www.spartanburgregional.com/CEEvents

Registration fees: $100.00 (additional fee after Oct 9, 2015 is $25.00)

$50.00 for Undergraduate/Full-time students

Registration, Coffee, Exhibits, Networking starts at 7:30 am

Welcome and Introduction begins at 8:25 am

This year our Keynote speaker will start us off with her compelling personal story of how she survived human trafficking.

We will also be giving out door prizes prior to the first session, so please stay after our keynote!!

Thank you to our Sponsors:

Children’s Advocacy Center

First Presbyterian Church

SAFE Homes-Rape Crisis Coalition

7th Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office

South Carolina Legal Services

Spartanburg County Department of Social Services

Spartanburg County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council

Spartanburg City Police Department

Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office

Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System

Wells Fargo

 

Sep 112014
 

Whenever there’s an allegation of domestic abuse, defenders of the accused bring up due process. In light of Ray Rice being cut by the Baltimore Ravens on Monday, hours after TMZ published a video of the running back assaulting his wife in an elevator, consider the completely undue process Janay Palmer has endured over the past several months. Consider how much hurt and humiliation it took for this sorry semblance of a resolution to be reached:

continue reading here

Jul 022013
 

After years of budget cuts, domestic and sexual violence programs have been forced to reduce services and victims are feeling the impact. The Congressionally-mandated sequester cuts are now taking effect, further decimating the resources that victims need to escape and heal from violence and abuse. Please join us in calling on Congress to end the sequester and ensure that lifesaving services will continue to be available to victims of domestic and sexual violence!

Take action via the link below and share this infographic that explains the devastating impact of funding cuts.

http://www.nnedv.org/policy/takeaction/3854-sequestration-endangers-women-2013.html

Feb 192013
 

Teen Dating Violence (DV) Prevention and Awareness Month is a national effort to raise awareness about abuse in teen and 20-something relationships and promote programs that prevent it during the month of February.

The repercussions of teen dating violence are impossible to ignore – they hurt not just the young people victimized but also their families, friends, schools and communities. Throughout February, organizations and individuals nationwide are coming together to highlight the need to educate young people about dating violence, teach healthy relationship skills and prevent the devastating cycle of abuse.

The History of Teen DV Month

For years, young people across the nation have organized to put a stop to dating abuse. With their adult allies, they achieved a major victory in 2005 when the importance of addressing teen dating abuse was highlighted in the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.

The following year, Congress followed the lead of dozens of national, state and local organizations in sounding the call to end dating abuse. Both Chambers declared the first full week in February “National Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Week.” Then in 2010, they began dedicating the entire month of February to teen dating violence awareness and prevention.

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