Jun 212016
 

Checking up on applicants’ social media profiles is becoming routine for many employers and admissions offices around the country. There’s nothing wrong with using social platforms for fun, but a little awareness will go a long way. This is our guide to taking control of your online reputation.

Most people treat their social media accounts as purely social outlets, casually updating statuses and posting photos with little expectation of scrutiny from friends or followers. The idea that these actions could seriously limit educational or professional prospects rarely impedes sharing. Unfortunately, it should.

Checking up on applicants’ social media profiles is becoming routine for many employers and admissions offices around the country. Recruiters say social media helps them gain a more comprehensive picture of a candidate than a simple resume and cover letter. Depending on how they view what they find, an applicant’s web presence can make or break an offer. This is especially true for students or recent graduates lacking a detailed job history to support their application.

There’s nothing wrong with using social platforms for fun, that’s what they’re for. Don’t run off and remove every cat gif from your Tumblr account; no employer expects or wants that. But a little awareness will go a long way. We sat down with Diane Domeyer, executive director of the The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service for interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals, to get a better idea of the importance of an online reputation and the effects it can have. Having recently run several surveys regarding online presence and hiring practices, she had some very interesting insights to share.

Read full article here…

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